George Whitefield T-Shirt | PURITAN Collection

Regular price $ 25.00
George Whitefield was born on December 27, 1714 (December 16 of the Julian calendar), in Gloucester, England. The youngest of seven children, he was born in the Bell Inn where his father, Thomas, was a wine merchant and innkeeper. His father died when George was two and his widowed mother Elizabeth struggled to provide for her family. Because he thought he would never make much use of his education, at about age 15 George persuaded his mother to let him leave school and work in the inn. However, sitting up late at night, George became a diligent student of the Bible. A visit to his Mother by an Oxford student who worked his way through college encouraged George to pursue a university education. He returned to grammar school to finish his preparation to enter Oxford, losing only about one year of school.

In 1732 at age 17, George entered Pembroke College at Oxford. He was gradually drawn into a group called the "Holy Club" where he met John and Charles Wesley. Charles Wesley loaned him the book, The Life of God in the Soul of Man. The reading of this book, after a long and painful struggle which even affected him physically, finally resulted in George's conversion in 1735. He said many years later: "I know the place.... Whenever I go to Oxford, I cannot help running to the spot where Jesus Christ first revealed himself to me and gave me the new birth."

Forced to leave school because of poor health, George returned home for nine months of recuperation. Far from idle, his activity attracted the attention of the bishop of Gloucester, who ordained Whitefield as a deacon, and later as a priest, in the Church of England. Whitefield finished his degree at Oxford and on June 20, 1736, Bishop Benson ordained him. The Bishop, placing his hands upon George's head, resulted in George's later declaration that "My heart was melted down and I offered my whole spirit, soul, and body to the service of God's sanctuary."

Whitefield was an astounding preacher from the beginning. Though he was slender in build, he stormed in the pulpit as if he were a giant. Within a year it was said that "his voice startled England like a trumpet blast." At a time when London had a population of less than 700,000, he could hold spellbound 20,000 people at a time at Moorfields and Kennington Common. For thirty-four years his preaching resounded throughout England and America. In his preaching ministry he crossed the Atlantic thirteen times and became known as the 'apostle of the British empire.'

He was a firm Calvinist in his theology yet unrivaled as an aggressive evangelist. Though a clergyman of the Church of England, he cooperated with and had a profound impact on people and churches of many traditions, including Presbyterians, Congregationalists, and Baptists. Whitefield, along with the Wesleys, inspired the movement that became known as the Methodists. Whitefield preached more than 18,000 sermons in his lifetime, an average of 500 a year or ten a week. Many of them were given over and over again. Fewer than 90 have survived in any form.


• Printed on Bella + Canvas tees
• 100% combed and ring-spun cotton (heather colors contain polyester)
• Fabric weight: 4.2 oz (142 g/m2)
• Shoulder-to-shoulder taping
• Side-seamed

Size guide

  XS S M L XL 2XL 3XL 4XL
Length (inches) 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34
Width (inches) 16 ½ 18 20 22 24 26 28 30

Media Gratiae is an independent nonprofit (501c3) multimedia ministry based out of New Albany, Mississippi. Our desire is to produce film, print, and other media for the glory of Christ and for the good of His Church.

Media Gratiae (pronounced "GRAH - tee - ā") is Latin for "the Means of Grace."

Fallen man receives all the blessings of salvation out of the eternal fountain of the grace of God, in virtue of the merits of Jesus Christ and through the operation of the Holy Spirit. While the Spirit can and does in some respects operate immediately on the soul of the sinner, He has seen fit to bind Himself largely to the use of certain means in the communication of divine grace. " (L. Berkhof)

In other words, Christ has fully accomplished the redemption that the Father planned, and now the Spirit is applying that grace in time to the lives of God’s people all around the world. God has appointed certain “means” to serve as the channels through which the Spirit applies that grace. The scope of the work Media Gratiae produces is meant to give aid to the church here and abroad in its task of fulfilling the Great Commission by the use of those means.

We believe that the chief means of grace is God’s word. It alone has the promise of being the power of God unto salvation (Rom. 1:16; 1 Cor. 1:16). Paul tells us that faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God. In doing so, he elevates the preached word of God to the foreground as the means by which God’s own voice is heard by sinners (Rom. 10:13-17). Paul's determination to preach Christ and Him crucified is understood in light of the fact that it is the voice of our Savior that brings dead men out of their tombs (John 5:25).

In Acts 2 we see that the early church not only gave themselves to the apostles' teaching and prayer, but also to fellowship with one another. In addition to the crucial fellowship we experience by being committed to a local body of believers, we can also experience something of "the communion of the saints" by making use of Christian Biography. In this way we can be helped by the example of those who have followed our Lord before us, and follow Paul's admonition to keep our eyes on those who walk according to the example we have in him.

Two lines from a hymn by John Berridge—one a statement, the other an earnest prayer—sum up the mission and hope of Media Gratiae:

The means of grace are in my hand,
The blessing is at God’s command
Who must the work fulfill;
And though I read, and watch and pray,
Yet here the Lord directs my way
And worketh all things still.

Prepare my tongue to pray and praise,
To speak of providential ways,
And heavenly truth unfold;
To strengthen well a feeble soul,
Correct the Wanton, rouse the dull,
And silence sinners bold.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 Matthew Robinson | Director, Media Gratiae