Thomas Brooks T-shirt | PURITAN Collection

Regular price $ 25.00
Thomas Brooks was born in 1608. He entered Emmanuel College, Cambridge, in 1625, where such New England Puritans as Thomas Hooker, John Cotton, and Thomas Shepard were also educated, but he appears to have left before graduating. Brooks was ordained as a preacher of the gospel in 1640 and became a chaplain to the parliamentary fleet, serving for some years at sea. That ministry is mentioned in some of his “sea-devotions” as well as his statement: “I have been some years at sea and through grace I can say that I would not exchange my sea experiences for England’s riches.”

After the Civil War, Brooks became minister at the church of St. Thomas the Apostle, Queen Street, London (1648-1651). He was often called to preach before Parliament. In 1652, he became rector of St. Margaret’s, New Fish Street Hill, which was the first church that burned to the ground in the Great Fire of London (1666). Like Thomas Goodwin and John Owen, Brooks preferred the Congregational view of church government. In 1662, he fell victim to the notorious Act of Uniformity.

After being ejected from his living, Brooks continued to preach in London, where he apparently suffered little persecution. He became minister of a congregation at Moorfields, near St. Margaret’s. Unlike many ministers, he stayed in London during the Great Plague of 1665, faithfully tending his flock. In 1672, he was licensed to preach according to the terms of the Declaration of Indulgence, but that license was revoked in 1676.

Brooks lost his first wife, Martha Burgess, a godly woman whom he greatly treasured, in 1676. He wrote of her, “She was always best when she was most with God in a corner. She has many a whole day been pouring out her soul before God for the nation, for Zion, and the great concerns of her own soul.” He later married a young God-fearing woman named Patience Cartwright (Alexander Grosart puts it succinctly: “she spring-young, he winter-old” [Works of Brooks, 1:xxxv]), who proved a most worthy companion.

Brooks died in 1680 and was buried in Bunhill Fields, London’s famous nonconformist cemetery. John Reeve, who preached at the funeral, said Brooks had “a sweet nature, great gravity, large charity, wonderful patience, and strong faith.”

- Excerpt from "Meet the Puritans" by Dr. Joel Beeke and Randall J. Pederson

• Printed on Bella + Canvas tees
• 100% combed and ring-spun cotton (heather colors contain polyester)
• Fabric weight: 4.2 oz (142 g/m2)
• Shoulder-to-shoulder taping
• Side-seamed

Size guide

  XS S M L XL 2XL 3XL 4XL
Length (inches) 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34
Width (inches) 16 ½ 18 20 22 24 26 28 30

Media Gratiae is an independent nonprofit (501c3) multimedia ministry based out of New Albany, Mississippi. Our desire is to produce film, print, and other media for the glory of Christ and for the good of His Church.

Media Gratiae (pronounced "GRAH - tee - ā") is Latin for "the Means of Grace."

Fallen man receives all the blessings of salvation out of the eternal fountain of the grace of God, in virtue of the merits of Jesus Christ and through the operation of the Holy Spirit. While the Spirit can and does in some respects operate immediately on the soul of the sinner, He has seen fit to bind Himself largely to the use of certain means in the communication of divine grace. " (L. Berkhof)

In other words, Christ has fully accomplished the redemption that the Father planned, and now the Spirit is applying that grace in time to the lives of God’s people all around the world. God has appointed certain “means” to serve as the channels through which the Spirit applies that grace. The scope of the work Media Gratiae produces is meant to give aid to the church here and abroad in its task of fulfilling the Great Commission by the use of those means.

We believe that the chief means of grace is God’s word. It alone has the promise of being the power of God unto salvation (Rom. 1:16; 1 Cor. 1:16). Paul tells us that faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God. In doing so, he elevates the preached word of God to the foreground as the means by which God’s own voice is heard by sinners (Rom. 10:13-17). Paul's determination to preach Christ and Him crucified is understood in light of the fact that it is the voice of our Savior that brings dead men out of their tombs (John 5:25).

In Acts 2 we see that the early church not only gave themselves to the apostles' teaching and prayer, but also to fellowship with one another. In addition to the crucial fellowship we experience by being committed to a local body of believers, we can also experience something of "the communion of the saints" by making use of Christian Biography. In this way we can be helped by the example of those who have followed our Lord before us, and follow Paul's admonition to keep our eyes on those who walk according to the example we have in him.

Two lines from a hymn by John Berridge—one a statement, the other an earnest prayer—sum up the mission and hope of Media Gratiae:

The means of grace are in my hand,
The blessing is at God’s command
Who must the work fulfill;
And though I read, and watch and pray,
Yet here the Lord directs my way
And worketh all things still.

Prepare my tongue to pray and praise,
To speak of providential ways,
And heavenly truth unfold;
To strengthen well a feeble soul,
Correct the Wanton, rouse the dull,
And silence sinners bold.

 

 

 


 

 

 

 Matthew Robinson | Director, Media Gratiae